Jokers Notebook ~ Module #26

Jokers Notebook ~ Module #26
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This is the training plan for the 26th week of the Jokers Training Program. This is a loaded training week; and it might take you more than a week to work through all the progressions. We will focus on lateral distance exercises, with discussions of the Accelerating Step and Triangular Pressure.

These exercises were based on an NDAL game from April of 2017. The course map—at the end of this document—will help you set equipment for this week’s exercises.


Accelerating Step

An “Accelerating Step” defined in simple terms is a fast step the handler takes just as the dog is passing. The step is intended to goose the dog forward.

This is a simple enough exercise.

We are basically practicing a progressive send to the pipe tunnel. However, in order to practice the “Accelerating Step” we must give the dog a chance to pass the handler who will practice the step.

In looking at the video (above) the exercise might have been better served by taking jump #1 from its other side. That being said, starting the sequence with a Back-pass might very well set up the accelerating step. So we could dispense with jump #1.

Tunnel Dogwalk Wrap

In this exercise we want to teach the dog to make the transitions between tunnel and dogwalk with the handler using directional commands.

In the drawing above the handler would use a “Right” command in both transitions. You could mirror this exercise to practice the transitions with a “Left” command.

Scale this exercise for the skill and experience of the dog.

Triangular Pressure

A dog tends to move in a path parallel to the handler’s path. A stationary handler has no path. One of the hardest things to teach a handler who is accustomed to running parallel to his dog, is what he should do when not running.

And the answer is: The handler should face and give movement to the next target obstacle, creating “triangular pressure.”

In this exercise the objective is for the handler to work at a progressive lateral distance to the dog as the dog does jump #3 and the tire at #4. Jump #3 quickly emerges as the obstacle on which the handler should provide focus. Focus can be defined as what the handler is looking at, facing, pointing towards, and moving towards if there is any movement at all. We’ve left the lines of the dog’s path and the handler’s path on the course map so that you can see the “triangle”.

The red lines represent the lateral distance progressive. We begin by working close and gradually work farther and farther away.

The video above shows the entire progression of this exercise.

Lateral A-frame

This is a simple enough exercise. The objective is to teach the dog to assume and maintain a two-on/two-off dismount of the A-frame while the handler remains in motion. The release should be verbal, and not at all based on handler movement.

The drawing here shows the basic exercise. The red lines illustrate the direction of the training progression. The handler increase in lateral distance should be modest and incremental.

This video shows the complete progressive exercise (with a dog that really needs this training).

Time Warp

The sequences in this lesson plan have been used in competition for a game called “Time Warp”. The briefing for the game is on the header of the course map.

You’ll note that the course design for the game was a Gilday/Houston collaboration. It shouldn’t be a shock that of 117 runs Gilday took 1st place with her girl Leela (20 on the bonus in 35.33 seconds for a final score of 15.33):

And Houston took 2nd place with is boy Kory (20 on the bonus in 36.8 seconds for a final score of 16.8):

Video Homework

Send links to one or more recordings of the exercises in this module.

BLOG1598 JNm26

Questions Comments and Impassioned Speeches to Bud Houston, Houston.Bud@gmail.com. Connect with me on FaceBook!

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Author: Bud Houston {authorlink}